The importance of crossing the midline

The body thus has two separate control centres coordinating the movements of the whole physical body, with an unseen 'midline' separating the left and right sides of the body. The control centres in the brain require good coordination and synchronisation in order to be able to move and act in a fluid and effective manner.

SAS Centre midlineNo, the midline is not the line in the middle of the road, but while we're mentioning that line, only cross it if it's safe to do so. The midline I'm interested in is an invisible line, or more accurately a plane, that divides our body in two, that separates left from right. Let me explain why it's important in relation to physical development and learning achievement.

The left side of our body is controlled by specialised processing centres in the right side of our brain, while the right side of our body is controlled by the left side of the brain. The body thus has two separate control centres coordinating the movements of the whole physical body, with an unseen 'midline' separating the left and right sides of the body. The control centres in the brain require good coordination and synchronisation in order to be able to move and act in a fluid and effective manner. We can observe that newborns are not very good at this as all their limbs are flying about without any coordination. But normally within months this improves considerably and by the time a baby starts to crawl, this coordination is already much better.

By the time a child start using his or her dominant hand, specialisation is starting to take place in the brain and this left-right division is starting to pay off. One side can become very good at fine motor skills for the dominant hand, relieving the other side to specialise in other brainy tasks. It's a bit like a football team, where a (specialised) right-winger kicks more accurately with his right foot and a left-winger is better with his left foot.

When our limbs cross this midline, our brain will send control signals from one side of the brain to the other side. We can strengthen synchronisation in the brain by making there cross mid-line movements, for instance, by first moving the right hand to the left knee and then the left hand to the right knee. Doing these kind of exercises for, say, 15 minutes each day, can help reduce impulsivity and hyper-active behaviour and boost attention and concentration.

The SAS neuro-sensory brain training method addresses each brain-half separately with specially processed music, tones and speech with the aim to improve inter-hemispheric communication, speed up processing and strengthen language development.

The method does not require attention or movement and can be used by clients of all abilities. Courses are individually designed to ensure they fit the abilities and needs of each client. A full course includes over 100,000 cross mid-line processing movements.Client feedback indicates improvements in attention, understanding, speech and language, social skills, behaviour and self-worth.

This article was read 1909 times.


Related Bulletins

Most people prefer right ear for listening

Most people prefer to be addressed in their right ears in everyday settings and are more likely to do a favor when the request is received in their right ears rather than their left ones, new research suggests

More about brainwaves

In most of the SAS programmes we use Binaural Frequency Differentials (BFD), which aim to gently guide our naturally occurring brainwaves in a certain direction, either up or down, faster or slower.

Auditory processing in the brain

Sounds received through our right ear is mainly processed in the left brain half and sounds coming into our left ear are mainly processed in the right half.

Ear dominance

You know if you are right or left handed, unless you belong to the very select group of naturally ambidextrous people who are equally at ease using their right hand or their left hand for all tasks. There is also mixed handedness, where some tasks are more easily performed with one hand and other tasks more easily with the other hand. But apart from these exceptions to the rule, most people are either right or left handed.